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IKAN LAUT

Snapper grey  (Lutjanus griseus)

(Linnaeus, 1758); LUTJANIDAE FAMILY; also called mangrove snapper, mango snapper
Grey snapper are one of the most abundant species of snapper throughout their range, which includes Bermuda south to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the entire Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean. They are found in a variety of habitats, which includes inshore seagrass beds and mangrove lagoons, but the largest are located on offshore reefs and wrecks. They also be found in completely freshwater areas in parts of Florida. They often form large aggregations, but have the habit of becoming difficult to catch once several of their cohorts have been hooked. Grey snapper feed on a wide variety of prey items including shrimp, crabs, and fish. It is a popular species with anglers and its varied diet allows it to be taken on natural bait, artificial lures, and even flies. It is also an excellent eating species .

Queenfish doublespotted   (Scomberoides lysan)

Lacepede, 1802; and / Scomberoides lysan (Forsskal, 1775); CARANGIDAE FAMILY; also called leatherskin, spotted leatherskin, giant dart, white fish, skinny fish

The talang and the doublespotted queenfish range widely over the Indo Pacific. The talang has been verified from the Gulf of Thailand, Okinawa, Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Australia, and the east coast of Africa. The doublespotted has a similar range and also occurs in the Hawaiian Islands, but is unconfirmed in the Gulf of Thailand.

The queenfish has an oblong to elliptical profile with a very short head and a strongly compressed body (from whence the name “skinny fish”. Its lateral line is straight except for a weak, slightly wavy arch over the pectoral fins. The scales are partially embedded. The tail is deeply forked as is typical of carangids and the second dorsal and anal fins are prominent anterior lobes. The first dorsal fin consists of 6 7 short spines with very little visible membrane. The spines are depressible into a groove on the back. The second dorsal fin has one spine and 19 21 soft rays.

The mouth is large on the talang extending well back beyond the eyes. The forehead is slightly rounded (convex) or may have a small bump over the eyes, and the fin lobes are twice as high as in the doublespotted. It has a single row of 5 8 round spots above the lateral line, with the first two possibly touching or intersecting the lateral line.

The doublespotted has a double row of round spots, 5 8 above the lateral line and a parallel row of 5 8 below the line. The mouth extends back only to the back of the eye or scarcely beyond it and the forehead is slightly but noticeably indented.

Both fish are generally dusky green to bluish above, fading to gray, silvery or white below. The high second dorsal and anal fin lobes of the talang are uniformly pigmented (dusky or light) from the body to the tip, whereas in the part of the lobes that extends above the finlets in the doublespotted (the distal half) is distinctly and abruptly darker.

They generally frequent in shore lagoons, reefs, and off shore islands. They may enter estuaries, but the talang does not tolerate low salinity well, nor does it like turbid water. Queenfish are daytime feeders and prefer small pelagic fish, squids, and other fast moving prey. Occasionally they may also feed on crustaceans.

The queenfish is extremely popular as a sport fish and is an excellent fighter on light tackle. Small live baits and trolled lures are preferred. Many anglers say that the coarse flesh is rather tasteless and is better smoked, while others that it is quite good when very fresh. In any event, the leathery skin is best removed before cooking and one should avoid touching the spines of the dorsal and anal fins, as they are poisonous and can inflict very painful wounds .

Queenfish talang  (Scomberoides commersonnianus)

Lacepede, 1802; and / Scomberoides lysan (Forsskal, 1775); CARANGIDAE FAMILY; also called leatherskin, spotted leatherskin, giant dart, white fish, skinny fish

The talang and the doublespotted queenfish range widely over the Indo Pacific. The talang has been verified from the Gulf of Thailand, Okinawa, Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Australia, and the east coast of Africa. The doublespotted has a similar range and also occurs in the Hawaiian Islands, but is unconfirmed in the Gulf of Thailand.

The queenfish has an oblong to elliptical profile with a very short head and a strongly compressed body (from whence the name “skinny fish”. Its lateral line is straight except for a weak, slightly wavy arch over the pectoral fins. The scales are partially embedded. The tail is deeply forked as is typical of carangids and the second dorsal and anal fins are prominent anterior lobes. The first dorsal fin consists of 6 7 short spines with very little visible membrane. The spines are depressible into a groove on the back. The second dorsal fin has one spine and 19 21 soft rays.

The mouth is large on the talang extending well back beyond the eyes. The forehead is slightly rounded (convex) or may have a small bump over the eyes, and the fin lobes are twice as high as in the doublespotted. It has a single row of 5 8 round spots above the lateral line, with the first two possibly touching or intersecting the lateral line.

The doublespotted has a double row of round spots, 5 8 above the lateral line and a parallel row of 5 8 below the line. The mouth extends back only to the back of the eye or scarcely beyond it and the forehead is slightly but noticeably indented.

Both fish are generally dusky green to bluish above, fading to gray, silvery or white below. The high second dorsal and anal fin lobes of the talang are uniformly pigmented (dusky or light) from the body to the tip, whereas in the part of the lobes that extends above the finlets in the doublespotted (the distal half) is distinctly and abruptly darker.

They generally frequent in shore lagoons, reefs, and off shore islands. They may enter estuaries, but the talang does not tolerate low salinity well, nor does it like turbid water. Queenfish are daytime feeders and prefer small pelagic fish, squids, and other fast moving prey. Occasionally they may also feed on crustaceans.

The queenfish is extremely popular as a sport fish and is an excellent fighter on light tackle. Small live baits and trolled lures are preferred. Many anglers say that the coarse flesh is rather tasteless and is better smoked, while others that it is quite good when very fresh. In any event, the leathery skin is best removed before cooking and one should avoid touching the spines of the dorsal and anal fins, as they are poisonous and can inflict very painful wounds .

Snapper Papuan black  (Lutjanus goldiei)

(Macleay, 1882); LUTJANIDAE FAMILY; also called Niugini bass, Papuan black bass, pargo de Papua, vivaneau de Papua, ikan merah
The Papuan black snapper is known only from southern Papua New Guinea from the Port Moresby district to the Fly River. Popularly know as Niugini bass and Papuan black bass, this species is actually a member of the snapper family. It is rated as one of the worlds toughest yet least-known freshwater fishes. The fish inhabits large, snag infested jungle streams and tributaries and may occur in estuaries.

The stocky Papuan black snapper resembles a cross between a mangrove (gray) snapper and a largemouth bass. The large scaled body is silvery to steely gray or black. There are two distinct color phases with the entire body blackish or with a series of 6 or 7 broad grayish bars on the sides. It has two large canine teeth in the upper jaw and smaller teeth on the lower jaw.

Casting with saltwater-quality surface plugs or shallow and medium running plugs is the most common method of fishing for this species. Papuan black bass are also caught trolling and a few have discovered that fly-fishing is possible. The major challenge is stopping an individual before it dives for cover. Locals use short, powerful rods, reels with top-quality drags and heavy leaders to cope with logs, rocks and other obstructions encountered in bass habitat.

This jungle brawler is a popular sport fish, forming the basis of a safari-angling industry

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